The Complete Starfleet Library

This page is a detailed examination of the Star Trek books published in a given year.
Use the pull-down menus and site search at the bottom of the page to find lists of books by type, title, or author, to navigate through the site, or to search the site.

1974

Star Trek 10Star Trek 10
James Blish
Bantam
164 pages

Contents

Preface
The Alternative Factor
The Empath
The Galileo Seven
Is There In Truth No Beauty?
A Private Little War
The Omega Glory

Blurb

As the Enterprise hurtles through space, the crew must destroy a ravening, murderous monster aboard the Starship; Kirk discovers an incredibly beautiful creature with strange powers of healing; Spock views the forbidden Kollos and goes insane; and more!

Comments

See Star Trek 1, published in 1967, for comments.

Star Trek Annual 1975Star Trek Annual 1975
World Distributors

Contents

The Mummies of Heitius VII
The Cosmic Cavemen
The Trial of Captain Kirk

Comments

"The Mummies of Heitius VII," "The Cosmic Cavemen," and "The Trial of Captain Kirk" are reprints of issues 21, 17, and 24 of the Gold Key Star Trek comic. Thanks to Randy Brower for the contents and cover scan.

See the first volume of Star Trek Annual, published in 1969, for comments.

Log One coverStar Trek Log One
Alan Dean Foster
Ballantine
184 pages

Contents

Beyond the Farthest Star
Yesteryear
One of Our Planets Is Missing

Blurb

Star Trek

The series they could not kill!

Good news for Star Trek fans: the series is back on the air! The critically acclaimed animated series features all new stories of the starship Enterprise and its famous crew.

Ballantine proudly launches the Star Trek Log series, lively adaptations of the best episodes -- now in paperback for the first time.

Complete in this volume

Beyond the Farthest Star
Yesteryear
One of Our Planets is Missing

"NBC's new animated Star Trek is... fascinating fare, written, produced and executed with all the imaginative skill, the intellectual flare and the literary level that made Gene Roddenberry's famous old science-fiction epic the most avidly folowed program in TV history..."
-- Cecil Smith
The Los Angeles Times

Series Comments

By the time the Star Trek animated series was aired in 1973, James Blish's adaptations of the original series were an established success. Ballantine bought the rights to produce adaptations of the animated series and hired young science fiction writer Alan Dean Foster to do the adaptations. At the time, Foster had written three SF novels for Ballantine and a number of short stories. He later went on to become the king of SF movie adaptations (Dark Star, Alien, and Star Wars, though the last was credited to George Lucas) and has written a considerable number of SF and fantasy novels over the years, becoming very successful in his own right.

Unlike Blish, who shortened and streamlined hour-long episodes into very short stories, Foster greatly expanded his half-hour episodes. He added subplots, characters, and, occasionally, explanations for some of the stranger things that happened in the series. Foster adapted three episodes per book for the first six volumes, then followed with four books that expanded a single episode to an entire novel. In each case, the original episode provided the story for the first few chapters, and Foster carried the story on from there, sometimes into territory that might as well have been a different story altogether. The amount of story material Foster added was enough to make these books seem almost more like original novels rather than simple adaptations.

Over the years, the books have been reprinted in consolidated form. In 1993, Del Rey published three volumes with three Logs each, leaving out Star Trek Log Ten. In 1996, according to the Del Rey website, the books were published in more expensive editions (trade paperbacks, probably) with all ten books in five volumes. 

As was not unusual for the animated series, the episodes adapted here were written by people associated with the original Star Trek (Samuel Peeples, D.C. Fontana, and Marc Daniels).

Star Trek Log TwoStar Trek Log Two
Alan Dean Foster
Ballantine
176 pages

Contents

The Survivor
The Lorelei Signal
The Infinite Vulcan

Blurb

More lively adaptations from television's most popular science-fiction series!

Complete in this volume

The Survivor

Our old friend Carter Winston is back aboard the Enterprise for a visit -- or is he?

The Lorelei Signal

A strange "siren's song" calls the men of the Enterprise to an exotic planet -- Lt. Uhura to the rescue!

The Infinite Vulcan

On a routine mission to Phylos, Spock is mysteriously kidnapped -- he faces a dubious future!

Comments

See Star Trek Log One, above, for comments on this series.

Two of the animated episodes here are by original series veterans, "The Lorelei Signal" by Margaret Armen and "The Infinite Vulcan" by actor Walter Koenig. Koenig's character Chekov did not appear in the animated series, making this story Koenig's contribution to the animated series.

Also of interest:

The Questor TapesQuestor cover
D.C. Fontana
Ballantine
156 pages

Blurb

The gripping story of an artificial man... a fast-paced adventure moving from the Los Angeles freeways to the bustling London metropolis... and on to the distant peaks of Mount Ararat for a spectacular climax!

Comments

After Star Trek was cancelled in 1969, Gene Roddenberry tried to sell several more TV series. The ones that made it as far as pilot stage were Genesis II, Planet Earth (a reworked Genesis II for another network), The Questor Tapes, and Spectre.

D.C. Fontana, who had worked on the original and animated Star Trek (and would later work on The Next Generation), would have been story editor for The Questor Tapes, if it went to series. It didn't; neither did Roddenberry's other non-Trek pilots. However, Fontana adapted the pilot as a novel and Ballantine, then the publisher of The Making of Star Trek, David Gerrold's nonfiction books, and the Star Trek Logs by Alan Dean Foster, published it.

The basic concept of The Questor Tapes can be described simply: Data in the 20th century. Questor is the character Data was based on. He is an android who is "fully functional" but, due to his programming, lacks human emotions, which he wishes he understood. For Next Generation fans, Roddenberry fans, and D.C. Fontana fans (she also wrote the Pocket Star Trek novel Vulcan's Glory), this is worth tracking down.


1973
1974
1975